Interest Groups

Vintage trade card, Beard & Allen Family Groceries, c. 1880sBusiness history has long been included in the curriculum of MBA and undergraduate business programs in the conviction that training in leadership requires a long-term and internationally focused view of the world. Faculty and programs in business schools around the world have made significant contributions to the development and growth of business history. Yet the culture and priorities of management training differ somewhat from those in departments of history and economics. The BHC has many members teaching in schools of management and business who work to expand the role of business history in the curriculum of their institutions. They have created an informal networking group whose members come together over lunch at the BHC annual meeting to discuss issues and concerns.

Victorian-era trade card for Pears SoapThe Emerging Scholars Committee of the Business History Conference focuses on introducing young scholars to the possibilities for researching and teaching in the field of business history. The committee (whose current membership can be found on our Committees page) identifies advanced students attending the annual meeting and works to integrate them into the larger community of business historians and academics. The committee prepares a number of emails prior to each annual meeting in order to invite young scholars to the various events held that provide a space for learning about business history and meeting BHC attendees and members. These events include an introductory breakfast held on the second day of the conference and a reception held the same evening, both of which are opportunities for new scholars to network with BHC-affiliated members with a wide range of experiences within the field. Following the conference the committee also follows up with attendees to gauge their experience in order to improve future events and to continue to expand the network of historians of business.

Trade card, McCormick Harvesting Machine CompanyWomen in Business History (WiBH) consists of an informal group who have joined together at Business History Conference meetings for several years. Over lunch, they network, share career information, and trade insights on professional development. Some of the women work in areas related to gender in business and economic history, but the group's scholarly interests span the field.